Introducing our new blog: Around the Editors’ Table

Around the Editors’ Table is the freshly baked-pulled-from-the-oven-steaming-hot blog that will feature original writing by members of Saint Paul Almanac’s community editor group.

A Saint Paul Almanac community editors meeting at the Black Dog cafe in Lowertown, St. Paul, 2010.

A Saint Paul Almanac community editors meeting at the Black Dog cafe in Lowertown, St. Paul, 2010. (Photo: Dan Tilsen)

Each fall, a new group of editors is convened. The group of about 24 people meets for 14 weeks and works collectively to decide what goes into the Saint Paul Almanac. The editors read and discuss hundreds of submissions and improve their own writing and editing through workshop sessions with professional writers, editors, and publishers.

This blog idea was cooked up in collaboration by editors Kemet Imhotep, Kathryn Pulley, Shaquan Foster, Ka Zoua Vang and Lisa Steinmann with expert advice from Almanac webmaster Nigel Parry and publisher Kimberly Nightingale.

The first 2014 Saint Paul Almanac Community Editors' meeting in the AZ Gallery on October 30th, 2012. (Photo: Dan Tilsen)

The first 2014 Saint Paul Almanac Community Editors’ meeting in the AZ Gallery on October 30th, 2012. (Photo: Dan Tilsen)

We envision this blog as a place to get to know the editors, past and present, through their personal writing. It will feature poetry, prose, lyrics, interviews, articles, Spoken Word compositions and more. Text, photography, artwork are all welcome.

The pieces submitted must be self-edited and are subject to publishing discretion and tweaks from the Almanac. Pieces should also be accompanied by a short bio and a photo.

Past and current Community Editors are invited to submit to table@saintpaulalmanac.org. Learn more about the Community Editor Project.

 

Lisa Steinmann contributed to the 2013 Saint Paul Almanac, has just began her second year as a Community Editor, and recently started serving on the Almanac board. A Saint Paul–based writer, teacher, and artist, Lisa’s work spans both sides of the Mississippi river and other divides as well.

Leave a Reply